Is Your Debt Too Old to Collect On?

The statute of limitations on debt in the state of Tennessee is six years. This means that if a debt has not been repaid in six years, the lender cannot sue to collect the debt. There are several important factors that debtors should be aware of, however, before placing their hopes of financial freedom on the statute of limitations.

The statute of limitations on debt only protects debtors from being sued by creditors. It does not erase the existing debt. Debt is only erased by repayment or bankruptcy. After the statute of limitations has passed, creditors can still attempt to collect the debt through phone calls and letters.

It is also possible to restart the clock on the statute of limitations on debt. The statute of limitations starts once activity on the account stops. Using a credit card or, in some states, even making a payment on the debt in question can restart the statute.

Even though it is illegal under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, creditors may still try to sue to collect a debt after the statute of limitations has expired. If this is the case, it is important to be present at proceedings to explain to the court that the statute has expired.

Contact Us for a Free Bankruptcy Consultation

If you or a loved one has been struggling with debt and the statute of limitations on the debt does not expire for several years, it may be beneficial to speak with an experienced bankruptcy attorney, who can help you decide if filing for bankruptcy is a good fit for you and guide you through the bankruptcy process.

Please contact the Nashville bankruptcy lawyers at Rothschild & Ausbrooks, PLLC, and learn more about your rights under the law.

We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code.